The Traffic Stop: Tips for School Commuters

By MPD Sergeant Mo Hawkinson
September 13, 2016

It's TUESDAY and this week the Traffic Section at McPherson KS Police Department offers the following traffic tips for drivers and parents of students commuting to school.

TIPS FOR DRIVERS:

• When driving, be especially alert in residential neighborhoods and school zones & be on the lookout for bikers, walkers, or runners who may be distracted or step into the street unexpectedly.

• Give pedestrians the right of way & look both ways when making a turn to spot any who may not be immediately visible.

• Take Action against Distraction: When driving, put cell phones & other distractions in the back seat or out of sight until your final destination.

• Enter & exit driveways and alleys slowly and carefully.

• Remember if you See Something, Say Something. Pull over to report physical bullying, dogs at large, and erratic driving you see during your commute. Sharing this info increases neighborhood security and personal safety for everyone –especially, our kids.

TIPS FOR PARENTS:

• Remind kids to make eye contact with drivers before crossing the street, watch out for cars turning or backing up, and never run or dart out into the street or cross between parked cars.

• It’s always best to walk on sidewalks or paths & cross at street corners using traffic signals and crosswalks. Most injuries happen mid-block or somewhere other than intersections. Walk facing traffic and as far to the left as possible, if there are no sidewalks.

• Teach kids at an early age to put down their devices & then look left, right, and left again when crossing the street. Make it a rule to put headphones, cell phones, or electronic devices down when crossing the street. It’s particularly important to reinforce this message to teens.

• Also remind children to be aware of others who may be distracted —& tell a trusted adult when they see someone who is in danger.

• Set a good example by putting devices down when you are driving or walking around town. Our kids mimic the behavior we model for them.


Close